Representing Injured Michigan Clients for More than 30 Years

Frequently Asked Questions


Directions to Our Offices
Directions to Court House
Laws
Terms


LOCATION
Lady JusticeWe are located in historic downtown Monroe at 19 E Front Street near the corner of Washington Street. We are one block away from the Monroe County Courthouse.

DIRECTIONS TO OUR OFFICE
From Toledo, Ohio
Take I-75 North to the Elm Avenue Exit at Monroe. When you get off of the Exit, head West, which is a right hand turn at the bottom of the ramp. You will be going underneath the expressway to head west. Follow East Elm Avenue until you come to the 3rd traffic light, which is Monroe Street.

At this light, turn left. The identifying characteristics at this corner is a large statue of General George Armstrong Custer on horseback. After you turn left onto Monroe Street, go to the second traffic light, which is First Street, and turn left. Go down one block to Washington Street and turn left again. {The Monroe County Courthouse is located on the corner of Washington and First Street} Go one block, and turn left onto East Front Street. The office is approximately 100 feet down on the North side of East Front Street (right hand side). Our office is located on the South Shore of the River Raisin.

There is free one-hour parking in front of the office.

Map to our office

From Detroit, Michigan
Take I-75 South to the East Elm Avenue Exit. At the bottom of the exit ramp, continue to head to your right (it is almost straight ahead). When you get off of the Exit, head West, which is a right-hand turn at the bottom of the Exit ramp. Follow Elm Avenue until you come to the 3rd traffic light, which is Monroe Street. At this light, turn left. The identifying characteristic at this corner is a large statue of General George Armstrong Custer on horseback. After you turn left onto Monroe Street, go to the second traffic light, which is First Street, and turn left. Go down one block to Washington Street and turn left. (The Monroe County Courthouse is located on the Corner of Washington Street and First Street) Then go one block, and turn left onto East Front Street. The office is approximately 100 feet down on the North side of East Front Street (right hand side). Our office is located on the South Shore of the River Raisin.

There is a one-hour free parking time limit in front of the office.

Map to our office
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DIRECTIONS TO COURT HOUSE
From Toledo, Ohio
Take I-75 North to the Elm Avenue Exit at Monroe. When you get off of the Exit, head West, which is a right hand turn at the bottom of the ramp. You will be going underneath the expressway to head west. Follow Elm Avenue until you come to the 3rd traffic light, which would be Monroe Street. At this light, turn left. The identifying characteristics at this corner are a statue of General George Armstrong Custer on horseback. After you turn left onto Monroe Street, go to the second traffic light, which is First Street, and turn left. The Courthouse will be one block down on your right-hand side.

The Courthouse offers metered parking all around its perimeter.

Map to Court House

From Detroit, Michigan
Take I-75 South to the East Elm Avenue Exit. At the bottom of the exit ramp, continue to head to your right (it is almost straight ahead). When you get off of the Exit, head West, which is a right-hand turn at the bottom of the Exit ramp. Follow Elm Avenue until you come to the 3rd traffic light, which would be Monroe Street. At this light, turn left. The identifying characteristics at this corner are a statue of General George Armstrong Custer on horseback. After you turn left onto Monroe Street, go to the second traffic light, which is First Street, and turn left. The Courthouse will be one block down on your right-hand side.

Map to Court House
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LAWS
Laws control the conduct of men and make civilization possible. Ours is a nation of laws and not of men. The laws proscribing our conduct are set forth in Constitutions, Statutes, Ordinances, Common Law case decisions and administrative rules.

A. FEDERAL CONSTITUTION
The basic law of the United States establishes the framework and character of the Federal Government, as well as setting the limits of its power, as compared to that of the States and individual citizens.

B. FEDERAL STATUTES
Federal laws, rules, and regulations passed by the United States Congress that apply to all fifty States.

C. FEDERAL COMMON LAW
The Judge-made law of Federal Courts, created by Judicial decisions and prior rulings rather than Statutes or the Constitution.

D. FEDERAL ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
Laws, rules, and regulations created by Federal Agencies (such as: Internal Revenue Service, Environmental Protection Agency) under authority granted by Congress.

E. STATE CONSTITUTION
The basic law of a State that establishes the framework and character of the State Government, as well as setting the limits of its power as compared to that of local Governments and citizens.

F. STATE STATUTES
State laws, rules, and regulations passed by the State Legislature that apply to the entire State.

G. STATE COMMON LAW
The Judge-made law of State Courts created by Judicial decisions rather than State Statutes or Constitutions.

H. STATE REGULATIONS
Laws, rules, and regulations created by State Agencies under authority granted by the State Legislature.

I. CITY OR TOWNSHIP ORDINANCES
Rules and regulations created by local Governments under authority granted by the State Legislature or Constitution.

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TERMS
I. Insurance Terms

A. Named Insured
The person(s) or organization named on the Declaration Certificate.

B. Insured
The party who stands to benefit from an insurance policy. It means the person(s) or organization defined as those insured in the specific policy.

C. Insurance Policy
The written contract that defines the rights and obligations created by the insurance agreement.

D. Deductible
The clause in an insurance policy that exempts the insurer from paying an initial specified amount in the event that the insured sustains a loss.

E. Limits of Liabilities
The Limits of Liabilities are shown on the Declaration Certificate. The bodily injury limit for each person is the maximum amount that will be paid for bodily injury sustained by one person in one occurrence. The bodily injury limit for each occurrence is the maximum amount that will be paid for bodily injury sustained by two or more persons in one occurrence.

F. Bodily Injury
Bodily injury generally means physical injury, sickness, or disease sustained by a person including injuries resulting in the death of that person.

II. Types of Insurance Coverage

A. Collision Coverage
This coverage requires the insurance company will pay for loss or damage to your automobile and its equipment caused by accidental collision with another object or by accidental upset.

When a deductible is indicated in the Declaration in your coverage, the insurance company will reduce their payment by that amount. If your automobile is a private passenger automobile, the deductible does not always apply.

This coverage is voluntary and can be important if you vehicle is valuable as the No Fault law limits your rights to sue at fault drivers for collision damage in most cases to a maximum of $500.

B. Theft Coverage
This coverage requires the insurance company to pay for loss of or damage to your automobile and its equipment caused by theft, larceny, robbery, or pilferage.

This coverage is voluntary and can be important if your vehicle is valuable, as it is normally difficult to determine who has stolen your vehicle, and often damaged when recovered.

C. Uninsured Motorist
This coverage affords you protection for you pain and suffering losses if your are injured as the result of the negligence of an uninsured motorist. An uninsured motorist is a driver of a motor vehicle who is involved in an accident and has no motor vehicle insurance policy in effect on the vehicle. Although insurance is required in Michigan many drivers are non the less uninsured as a result having lost or never secured coverage. This type of coverage is voluntary and costs very little. It is essential to protect yourself and you family if you are seriously injured by an uninsured motorist.

D. Underinsured Motorist
This is an optional coverage, which you can purchase on most automobile insurance carriers as part of your own policy. This coverage affords protection to you and your family if the at fault car or driver has insurance but it is inadequate in amount to fully compensate you for your injuries. If you have this coverage your own insurance company can be liable to you for the uncompensated damages that you have suffered at the hands of an uninsured motorist.

E. No-Fault Insurance
Michigan is one of only many States that requires No-Fault automobile insurance coverage. This means that each individual's automobile insurer pays for their Personal Injury Protection benefits, and their own insureds vehicle damage (if they purchased collision coverage) regardless of who is at fault for the accident.

F. PIP: Personal Injury Protection
Personal Injury Protection Coverage is required coverage that affords protection for economic losses that you may suffer as a result of an accident involving a motor vehicle. Personal Injury Protection benefits consist primarily of wage loss for the first three years, medical benefits for medical treatment made necessary as a result of the accident for life, services that you may need as a result of the accident, survivor's loss benefits in the event of a death, and other benefits. Some of the common types of Personal Injury Protection Benefits are as follows:

1. Attendant Care Services
Expenses incurred to pay someone to help take care of you while you are disabled from a motor vehicle accident.
2. Replacement Services
You can be reimbursed for up to $20 per day to compensate for services that the injured person would have performed for himself or his family but for the accident.
3. Wage Losses
You may be entitled to work loss benefits consisting of up to 85 percent of the actual loss of income from work that the injured person would have performed during the first three years after the date of the motor vehicle accident if he or she had not been injured.
4. Survivor Losses
If a person is killed in a motor vehicle accident his survivors may be entitled to survivor loss benefits. These benefits could include medical expenses, wage losses and funeral benefits.
5. Medical Coverage
When an individual sustains injuries in an automobile accident, the auto insurer is responsible for payment of medical bills related to these injuries for the individual's lifetime. There is no lifetime cap.

You may be entitled to unlimited medical coverage from either an automobile insurance carrier, a health insurance carrier or self funded ERISA plan. These companies may be liable for primary or excess benefits and may or may not be entitled to assert subrogation rights. Consult you attorney as this area is extremely complex and involve numerous conflicts between State and Federal Law as well as conflicting contractual provisions.

G. Medical Coverage: Primary or Coordinated
Both your automobile and health policy or health plan may offer either primary or excess Medical benefits. Benefits shown as coordinated will be reduced by any amount paid or payable to you or any relative under any vehicle or premises insurance; individual, blanket, or group accident or disability insurance; and medical or surgical reimbursement plan. There are generally conflicts between plans, each carrier claiming that the other is liable for paying the bills first.

H. Priorities
Often there are several automobile insurance companies who may be liable for payment of personal injury protection benefits. In such a case you must determine which of these companies is primarily liable for payment of the benefits. It is usually the insurance carrier for the person named in policy, the person's spouse, or a relative of either domiciled in the same household, but it varies depending upon the factual situation involved.

Health insurance carriers or self funded ERISA plans also have payment priority and subrogation reimbursement disputes that must be answered by studying their policy language and applicable Statutes and Case law both State and Federal.

I. Personal Property Coverage
When an automobile accident results in damage to personal property, other than the vehicles involved (i.e., damage to homes, trees, fences, etc.), the auto insurer will pay a maximum of $1,000,000.00 towards repair or replacement of the damaged areas or items.

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